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The Gospel Spreading in Central Asia

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In June of this past summer, I moved back to Central Asia to do gospel work among my dear people who Christ purchased with His precious blood. Many of them do not know about the glorious good news of the cross. So, that is why I am here: to serve and help make Him known in this nation.

This summer was super busy for me. When I got back from the states, I met my new team that God had already provided for me to serve with here. I got to know them pretty quickly, and we began to pray, fast, dream and envision our future ministry in Central Asia. God opened so many doors for us to begin to do what we love: preaching and teaching the gospel and doctrine.

In the middle of the summer, we started five weeks of membership classes. After those classes, we collected around fifteen members that were interested in being part of our local congregation. We praise the Lord for these men and women who want to be a part of what the Lord is doing here.

Then, early in the fall of this year, we launched our first congregation. Over 70 people showed up to worship and hear the word preached at our launch! After the service, we had a big celebration of thanksgiving to our Sovereign God for His faithfulness and for everything He provided for us to launch this local congregation in Central Asia.

Just three weeks later, we moved to a physical building. Now, we have a place to meet on Sundays for worship and hearing the preaching of the Word.

We are very excited that God did all this in such a short period of time. 

I want to thank my God and Savoir, Jesus Christ for His mercy, grace, and strength to do all this with His sovereign power. I thank all of you, my prayer warriors and partners in the gospel. Thank you so much for your prayers and support. I couldn't do all this without your help. Please continue to support and lift me up for His glory and our joy. 

 


Timur Nesbitt lives in Central Asia and seeks to win the his native country to Christ.

 

What do the numbers say about Australia?

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It is hard to imagine, but our family is getting close to our 11th year of life in Australia. We continue to be amazed at this opportunity. Even as the seasons of life change with children getting older and ministries maturing, we continue to thank the Lord for the gift of serving in our adopted home. 

As the years progress, Australia continues to become part of our DNA. We have a ever-present love for our American heritage, but we feel our love of Australia grow. It is not easy sharing the Gospel in this melting pot culture, but with the various ministries and people we work alongside the opportunities continue to present themselves every day. We enjoy sharing this experience with visiting friends, family ranch mission teams, but we have to remember that most of our visitors have a very limited view of our sunburned homeland. 

One thing that is very different to America is that in Australia, it is compulsory to vote and to fill out our census form. Due to this requirement, our statistics are exceptionally accurate. Based on our last census report from the Australian Bureau of Statistics and McCrindle Research, here are a few statistics that might help people to see that Australia is a very different place than they thought.  

1. If Australia were a city, at 23.5 million it would still only be the world’s seventh largest (after Tokyo, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Jakarta, Seoul and Delhi).

2. The average street of 100 households has 10 babies (aged under 3), 27 cats and 45 dogs.

3. The average Australian stays with their employer just 3 years and 4 months – only a third of the way towards long service leave. If this plays out in the lifetime of a school leaver today, it means they will have 17 separate employers in their lifetime. 

4. In Australia, there are almost 100,000 more women than men, with six out of our eight states and territories experiencing a man drought.

5. Three decades ago, the median age of an Australian was 30.5, today it is 37.3, and in 2044 it is projected to be 40.

6. The average Australian spends 10 hours and 19 minutes each day on screen time – and due to ‘multi-screening’ this is achieved in just under eight hours of linear time.

7. By the time generation Z (five-19-year-olds) begin to retire (beginning in 2063) the average median capital city house price will exceed $2 million and the average retiree will need $600,000 more than today for a comfortable retirement.

8. If you lived on an average sized street in Australia comprised of 100 households, on that street there would be a marriage every 9 months, a death every 7 months and a birth every 14 weeks.

9. Currently, there are almost 105 baby boys born for every 100 baby girls born in Australia

10. The most widely said Australianisms are “no worries” (74 percent of Australians have used this phrase), “arvo” (73 percent), and “G’day” (71 percent).

11. Swimsuits in Queensland are known as togs, in NSW cossies, but in Victoria, bathers. And while Victorians use the word cantaloupe, in the rest of the country the fruit is known as rockmelon.

12. Australia is currently growing by 1 million every 2 years – that’s an additional city of Adelaide every 2.5 years.

13. Three decades ago, almost two in three Australians were married, while today, less than half are, and the “never married” proportion of Australians has increased from a quarter to a third.

14. There are more people in Sydney today than lived in all of Australia a century ago.

15. A quarter of Australians (27 percent) were born overseas and almost half of Australian households (46 percent) had at least one parent born overseas.

16. The average age of a first marriage is 29.8-years-old for men and 28.1 for women.

17. The median age at which men first become a dad is 33, and women have their first child at 30.7 years.

18. Australia is growing faster (1.8 percent a year) than any other country in the OECD. 

19. Australia’s death rate is at an all time low. And Sydney is the state capital with the lowest probability of death (5.3 deaths per 1,000) while Darwin and Hobart have the highest capital city death rates (6.6). 

For people who love to analyse numbers, these are fascinating numbers and help us to see where we need to be reaching people, and figure out unique methods of reaching Australians. Australia is not the same as the US, and we need to adjust our strategies for reaching people for Christ. 

The one statistic that grew the most over the since the last census is the number of people who said they were 'non-religious.' Going to church is not a regular thing for our nation. Sunday is considered Sport Day. It is a time for football, cricket or netball. 

To merely start a church is not going to reach the people of Australia. We have to have active evangelistic endeavours to reach people. We do this through workplace evangelism and unique events in cinemas. We are seeing fruit through these ministries at City Bible Forum and Reel Dialogue

Not to be discouraged, through these evangelistic efforts we are seeing church growth throughout our nation. With partnerships with Geneva Push and local pastors, we have seen a steady rate of churches starting and growing throughout Sydney. Alongside Pastor Ben Kwok, we have been serving for the past three years with the Rouse Hill Bible Church family. We are seeing regular growth and exciting stories of people coming in contact with Christ for the first time in their lives. 

We want to thank you for your regular support, prayers, and teams. It is a world away, but it means so much to us and helps us to continue the work of the Gospel in the land of Oz. 

 


Russ and his wife Cathy, along with their four children, live in and minister to the people of Australia. To learn more about their ministry, visit http://www.matthewsdownunder.com.

 

Seeing Gospel Opportunities in the Unexpected

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What if?

What if you won a million dollars? What would you do with it?

What if your car is stolen? What’s your immediate response? The next day? One week later?

What if a government official walks into your church and asks you what you believe?

Would any of these questions be easy?

For me, the million dollar question is way too easy. Why, I can spend 100 million dollars fairly quickly. Yes, mission work would be the main beneficiary, and the need is great.

The stolen car question was asked in three parts, because the three timelines can have three different responses. Shock? Disappointment? Anger? I think it was The Simpsons that taught me the chain of responses in a crisis situation is known by the acronym DAFBA: denial, anger (D’OH!), fear, bargaining, and acceptance. There’s no right answer. For me, the stolen car question has other implications. Some neighbors of ours in France had their car stolen recently, when someone broke into the house to find the keys, hanging on a hook by the door, and off he went with a free car. That could happen to us, although our car is not the most attractive. The real issue for me is if one doesn’t find our keys sitting out waiting to be taken. What happens when someone doesn’t get a “free” car?

Finally, the government official question. Or it may be a news team. Or in the office, or a co-worker. Or on the street... anyone that you don’t expect, as if the question startles you: what do you believe?  Or “who are you?”

Unexpected circumstances can yield gospel opportunities.

1 Peter 3:15 says “Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have.” Who would ever ask me? Maybe we should expect that more. Maybe we should interpret someone’s comment as his way of asking that question: “I don’t know what to believe anymore...” Is that not a wide-open door, begging you to walk through and share your faith?

Maybe the reason no one asks us about the hope we have is because no one knows we have this hope?

Lord, help us to keep our ears open, and especially our hearts open, for neighbors, co-workers, kids knocking at our doors during Halloween, suffering people around us, and help us to love. Help us to be ready to give a response for the hope you give us. Protect all those in areas where crime rears its ugly head, so that your children will rise up and be witnesses for your glory. Amen.

 


Gary, along with his wife and children, minister to the people of Lille, France.

The Christian Life is Not a DIY Project

I'm around people and talking to them literally all day when I am at work, and although I would classify myself as more of an introvert, I crave and look forward to simply being around other believers even when I am exhausted after work. Our world is not easy to live in as followers of Christ. In these days when Bedside Baptist is a fast growing “church” due to either the cramming in of additional activities or laziness, what we need is quality fellowship. We need to “get down to the nitty gritty” as Nacho Libre would say. We need to share life, pray, study, worship, and serve together. 

As a side note, yet on topic, I’m thankful for our lighthouses and the women’s ministry where we can sharpen one another and bear burdens together. If you aren’t involved in one of these groups, I strongly encourage you to join a lighthouse and/or Bible study. 

A few years back when I was in college, I began to understand the importance true fellowship has on being steadfast in faith and spiritual growth. I went to a Christian college, in fact, but even with requirements of daily chapel attendance, weekly church attendance, and a Bible minor, spiritual dryness remained a threat to the Christian bubble we lived in. One could still get involved with the wrong crowds of students, isolate themselves within their studies, or have the prideful idea that they don’t need accountability or discipleship. 

Not knowing anybody but my roommate going into my freshman year, I didn’t know what to expect when it came to finding a good solid group of friends. God used the friends he placed in my life to teach me more about Himself. A group of us who were in brother-sister halls formed a bond that has lasted beyond graduation. 

Towards the end of sophomore year through graduation day, we met every Sunday night to pray, sing, and read scripture. This was the first time I truly remember feeling unconditionally loved by people other than my family. Along with the laughing and goofing off, we shared trials, encouraged & prayed for each other, and some of us cried. And I can say, when you have 21 year old girls comfortable enough to cry through their struggles in front of 21 year old guys, and those guys respond with compassion and prayer, you know you are among some quality people. There was no judgement, and we all sought to serve and love each other. We weren’t perfect at this at all times, but God sustained our unity through forgiveness, selflessness, and focusing us on Christ. 

Now out of college, I have taken the lesson of necessity of church fellowship. One way God made us in His image was in our relational ability, as the Trinity is in constant unified fellowship. God uses biblical fellowship to show and give us His unconditional love, truth through the study of Scripture, refreshment of our souls, and the unity of the Church. Let us not take for granted our brothers and sisters in our lives who love and intercede in prayer for us.

God is glorified through the unity of His children (John 17:20–26).

Sermons in the Age of Twitter

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The weekly sermon is as much a part of the traditional worship service as the bulletin and singing the doxology at the conclusion. But wait, we don't sing the doxology at the conclusion of the service, and more and more churches are moving away from a printed bulletin in favor of a digital version.

So much in our church services has changed over the last 40 years, but one thing is still the same: the sermon. Sure, it's been modified over the years. It may be shorter, or longer, depending on your church, and it may focus more on answers to a nifty "how to" question with four or six memorable responses, again, depending on your church. But essentially, it's still the same.

At the same time, the process of learning has changed dramatically over the last 40 years, and continues to change at a rapid pace.

At a recent symposium of which I was a part, hosted by the Iowa Distance Learning Association, one of the presenters made the point that teaching and learning in colleges and universities is falling behind in their methodology compared to K–12 schools. Students entering college in 2016 are native learners in the land of 21st Century Learning, while many colleges and universities still employ "old school" methods of teaching. Primarily, the lecture accompanied by the ever-present PowerPoint deck, which usually has a blue background with a lot of white text. A lot. In old school teaching, the instructor is the one working, and the students are sitting and watching. In 21st Century learning, the students are the ones working and the teacher is there to guide their learning and discovery.

Churches would be wise to follow some of the changes happening within K–12 schools and higher education, and at least become familiar with the trends. Students today have a shrinking attention span. In their K–12 classrooms, they are likely to be engaged in project-based learning that forces the students to become active in the learning process, rather than passively sitting while a teacher lectures. Lectures, on the other hand, are often pre-recorded and delivered to students via a podcast or screencast that gives them the information they need to work on their projects, in collaboration with their teacher and other students when they are in class.

This is very different from a church service. Think about who is active in a church service, and who is sitting and observing? If you are 30 years and older, this is a common experience; if you are 29 years or younger, it is more likely a foreign way of learning.

The problem is apparent when you look around a congregation during a sermon. How many folks do you see who are engaged with their phone or tablet? Does this mean they are not engaged in the sermon? Not necessarily; we've become very skilled at multitasking when it comes to listening. Most folks today have their phone out when they watch television or even when they engage in conversation. Get a room of young people together in a social environment, and watch how many  are playing a game on their phone or browsing Facebook while fully engaged in conversation and watching television, all at the same time. Many of us only carry our phone or tablet to church with us, instead of a physical Bible. I get that. The Bible apps available today are excellent. Yet, we would be lying if we didn't admit that at least the temptation to glance at Facebook or email during church is always there. Just when you get to an important point in the sermon, a little notification goes off telling you someone just tagged you in a Facebook post with a headline, "YOU WON'T BELIEVE THIS!!!!!!!!!" 

Is the sermon dead?

No.

But, it is perhaps a harbinger of necessary change. Pastors and teachers within the church need to be aware that they are speaking to an increasingly distracted congregation with a decreasing attention span. One thing our teaching team does at First Family Church is carefully craft a Take Home Truth for every sermon. This simple sentence captures the key learning objective of the sermon and serves as the single point of application we want folks to take home. We work hard to make it simple and easy-to-remember. When it is all boiled down, we hope it is the Take Home Truth that sticks.

Staying Engaged During the Sermon

Here are some tips to help you stay engaged during longer periods of time and improve your overall learning retention:

  • Carry a Bible. If you impulsively wander from what you should be doing (reading the Bible, listening, or engaged in discussion) to things like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, leave your device in your pocket or your purse and carry a Bible. (NOTE: a book is a device with paper pages and words printed by ink.)
  • Use paper and pen. Research is showing there is a stronger cognitive connection when you use paper and pen rather than a digital device. You are engaging different areas of your brain and the simply physical representation of words on paper creates a stronger mental link that simple pixels on glass.
  • Take notes. One of the simplest and easiest ways to stay engaged and improve retention is to take notes. Lots of them. It forces you to become an active listener and to create summary nuggets of information as you listen, process, then write a note. Moreover, your notes will become valuable over time as you gather more in-depth notes on the Bible.

 

Posted by Chris Eller with 0 Comments

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